Archives

Things I am into
The Bear

The Bear

Close the internet! This is my colleague R’s new house mate. I kid you not. This is The Bear.

As of today, no further cats are required.

Peter & nou – new images

Shot by designer Matthew Walkerdine for his website, I’ve half inched these gorgeous new images of Peter & nou.

All those ‘corrections’ in Peter were drawn by me and then scanned and overlaid on the original text by Matt. Matt is, as is artist Jessica HigginsGood Press.

 

Harrison – the bookmark

Harrison – the bookmark

So, this exists. You can get one at Poundland – for a limited time before the high street leaks into an oily black sinkhole.

nou (2018)

nou (2018)

As you may have gathered, Peter (2014) has a partner and an opposite. Here’s a link to a 2 minute clip of my new video, nou (2018): nou clip.

nou (18 mins, 2018) – Inspired by Scottish socialist writer Naomi Mitchison’s Memoirs of a Spacewoman, nou is a tale of space travel, hypnosis and transformation – across time and space, from an alien world to a dentist’s chair. nou is the sequel to Peter (2014), which won Best PKD Short Film at the Philip K. Dick Science Fiction Film Festival, New York, 2017.

nou was first shown at Glasgow International 2018, as part of the always exciting Old Hairdresser’s programme, Old Hair, curated by Rob Churm.

Sound design for nou was by the inimitable Mark Vernon.

Peter & nou – the book(s)

Here’s my new publication, Peter & nou.

Matt and Jess at Good Press organised this and Matthew Walkerdine designed it too. It’s element heavy, with a sticker of a lab rat in a kaleidoscopic space/time traveling tunnel included for you, gratis. You’re welcome.

It comprises a book called Peter (like the film Peter, 2014), a book called nou (like the film nou, 2018), two postcards and an envelope – all in a beautiful box. The whole package echoes the dimensions of a DVD ‘boxset’ and if you post off your envelope, you get yet another book sent straight back to you. Well you will, when I get the gorgeous new return envelopes made up. Hang in there…

Get your copy now – a limited edition of only 250 – available from Good Press here.

ISBN: 978-1-9995858-0-8

Speculative Realism and Science Fiction by Brian Willems

Finally, I get it. I think so anyway. This book is currently changing my heed, into a marginally more understanding heed. And an excited heed. Thank you Brian Willems for using the right tools for this geek. And thanks too to Rob Churm for programming a talk by Brian into the Old Hair Programme as part of GI 2018. 

Do yourself a favour and buy Speculative Realism and Science Fiction by Brian Willems.

Things are coming together…

 …but for what, and who is nou?

Experiments In Cinema v13.6

Screen Used will be showing at this smashing looking film festival on Wednesday. Go Alburquonians…

Experiments In Cinema v13.6 will be held April 10–24, 2018 in Albuquerque, New Mexico. This year is the “Black Material Edition”. Films from the USA and 36 other countries will be presented at Guild Cinema and the African American Performing Arts Center during the festival. 

Download a .pdf of the entire EIC v13.6 program here.

Raw (2017)

Aaahhh, cannibalism. Who doesn’t rate it as a reasonable alternative to veganism? As long as it’s amongst friends. An old chum once observed that, if in an ‘Alive’ situation, I’d be tucking into the frozen, juicy dead before the airplane ready meals had run out. Maybe that’s why I enjoyed Julia Ducournau‘s Raw then. More a coming of age film (and its all about eating disorders of course) than a video nasty, this beautifully shot film also reminded me of those Bright College Days,

when lab coats were a daily staple.

Watch the trailer here.

 

Per Aspera Ad Astra (1981)

My preferred translation of this Russian title is To the Stars, the Hard Ways*. Watch it with english subs here.

‘The action of this film, *whose Latin title translates as Through the Thorns to the Stars, is based on a screenplay by cult Soviet sci-fi writer Kir Bulychev and is set in deep space and on fictional planets. A reconnaissance craft — named Pushkin in homage to Russia’s greatest poet — encounters a derelict starship. Inside is a humanoid woman with inhuman abilities — teleportation, telekinesis, and so forth.

Richard Viktorov directed the original 1981 version of this film. He died soon afterwards in 1983 while shooting The Comet, another sci-fi movie. Richard’s son, Nikolai Viktorov, released a new version of the film in 2015, having remastered the sound and special effects and shortened the running time by cutting several set pieces laced with Soviet ideology.’

www.russianartandculture.com/