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Things are coming together…

 …but for what, and who is nou?

Experiments In Cinema v13.6

Screen Used will be showing at this smashing looking film festival on Wednesday. Go Alburquonians…

Experiments In Cinema v13.6 will be held April 10–24, 2018 in Albuquerque, New Mexico. This year is the “Black Material Edition”. Films from the USA and 36 other countries will be presented at Guild Cinema and the African American Performing Arts Center during the festival. 

Download a .pdf of the entire EIC v13.6 program here.

Raw (2017)

Aaahhh, cannibalism. Who doesn’t rate it as a reasonable alternative to veganism? As long as it’s amongst friends. An old chum once observed that, if in an ‘Alive’ situation, I’d be tucking into the frozen, juicy dead before the airplane ready meals had run out. Maybe that’s why I enjoyed Julia Ducournau‘s Raw then. More a coming of age film (and its all about eating disorders of course) than a video nasty, this beautifully shot film also reminded me of those Bright College Days,

when lab coats were a daily staple.

Watch the trailer here.

 

Per Aspera Ad Astra (1981)

My preferred translation of this Russian title is To the Stars, the Hard Ways*. Watch it with english subs here.

‘The action of this film, *whose Latin title translates as Through the Thorns to the Stars, is based on a screenplay by cult Soviet sci-fi writer Kir Bulychev and is set in deep space and on fictional planets. A reconnaissance craft — named Pushkin in homage to Russia’s greatest poet — encounters a derelict starship. Inside is a humanoid woman with inhuman abilities — teleportation, telekinesis, and so forth.

Richard Viktorov directed the original 1981 version of this film. He died soon afterwards in 1983 while shooting The Comet, another sci-fi movie. Richard’s son, Nikolai Viktorov, released a new version of the film in 2015, having remastered the sound and special effects and shortened the running time by cutting several set pieces laced with Soviet ideology.’

www.russianartandculture.com/

Annihilation – Alex Garland – 2018

Annihilation is a far less anaemic film than Ex Machina and the casting’s perfect. The Thing, Stalker, The Crystal World each get a nod and there’s a very, very frightening bear. Lucky I caught it before I rainbow-ed my own current work in progress though…

Margaret Salmon, Mm & Sacred Paws @ The Tramway

Live score for Margaret’s Salmon’s Mm by Sacred Paws was exciting! Mm showing Berwick Speedway lads transforming from ordinary to adonis-y over a day, reduced to 30 minutes here. Sacred Paws caused dancing and warm feelings of admiration, made even cosier by the presence of favs. L and L.

Spoorloos (1989)

From under a snow-topped blanket, I loved Spoorloos (The Vanishing), George Sluizer’s film is reminiscent of much of Eric Rohmer’s 80s output. Or maybe it’s a fashion thing?

‘Based on Time Krabbe’s The Golden Egg, The Vanishing is a deeply disturbing psychological thriller about a young man’s search for his girlfriend after she disappears at a rest stop during a short trip.’ IMDB

“The best Blade Runner sequel is Peter by Jane Topping.” Matt M. Lloyd

I thought I was done and dusted with Facebook, and then Matt, director of the Glasgow Short Film Festival, posts this smashing endorsement of Peter.

I’m hoping my new video, working title Peter 2049 of course, will turn out to be the best Blade Runner sequel sequel.

Thanks Matt!

http://glasgowfilm.org/glasgow-short-film-festival

 

 

 

Pye Corner Audio: Stasis

I’m aye late to the audio party, but this is fantastic (and only a year old). Not sludgy or maudlin, Stasis is my current favourite to wiggle to. Less ‘creeping dread’ and more ‘dreamy disco with an otherworldly twist’ (thank you Holly Dicker). Buy it here.

Listen to it here.

Sex Symbols in Sandwich Signs – Stephen Sutcliffe

This is the Sutcliffe show you’ve been waiting for. Get to it…

Sex Symbols in Sandwich Signs takes its title from a damming review of David Storey’s novel ‘Radcliffe’, which was critical of all the qualities Sutcliffe admires, namely its bleak, alienating narrative and ‘garrulous’ characters. The exhibition pulls at the seams of identity, expanding upon recurrent themes in Sutcliffe’s work: self-doubt, obsession, cultural constructs and class conflict. Central to the exhibition, one of two new video works draws parallels between the story of Radcliffe and the unrequited homosexual fixations of British filmmaker, Lindsay Anderson, toward possessive actor, Richard Harris. The exhibition also features a collection of working notes and images from Sutcliffe’s personal archive associated with previous video works, placing emphasis on the central role of collage within his creative thought.”