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Things I have seen with my eyes

I Love Dick on the telly

Well, who doesn’t? Lots to love in Jill Soloway’s  TV version of Kraus’ novel fav. of mine. Excruciating in its accuracy of artists and of desire. Hilarious of course. Some episodes directed by Andrea Arnold!

Local fact: Ciara Philips has been in a lift with Bacon.

The Handmaid’s Tale 2017

This 1985 Atwood has never shifted from my top ten, and, like 1984, it works because there’s nothing in it that isn’t happening right now, to someone, somewhere. While Orwell’s future is made richer with language (and even includes a glossary), Atwood’s uses small, creeping increments of privation in the hope our ears prick up a la Niemöller’s First They Came. Want to step back 100 years? Just switch off all access to bank accounts marked with an F. Argggghhhhh…

The 1990 film of The Handmaid’s Tale feels like a made for TV erotic thriller, but Bruce Miller’s 2017 TV version is impeccable. And it’s sprouting into meatspace, in good ways…

Handmaid’s Tale Protest against Ohio abortion bill

Twilight City, 1989

Made for Channel 4, Black Audio Film Collective’s Twilight City is the absolute, no question, stand-out work at the CCA’s The Sky is Falling show. Get along, get comfy and watch it all…

Trailers for three other Black Audio Film Collective works here.

Berlin Report

Ably assisted by the students of University of Cumbria Institute of the Arts, I saw some things in Berlin. A man walking a pig, for instance.

I also saw a lot of art ‘n’ that. One post only, as you’ll be familiar with the itinerary…

Along with the big work by big lads, the Hamburger Bahnhof had a magnificent Adrian Piper show on, The Probable Trust Registry: The Rules of the Game #1-3, (numbers one and two, nosey) and the usual strip of belters (including Thomas Schütte, Pipilotti Rist and Isa Genzken/Wolfgang Tillmans).

The Bauhaus Archiv remains intact, this week showing loads of images of lassies in shorts, lassies on stairs, lassies doing gymnastics (the odd male Bauhaus student was photographed too, mostly in their suits strangely: ah, they were different times) and there is a show by Jasper Morrison too. He gives good fork.

Buchholtz Galerie was looking wealthy, I don’t think we need to worry about them, but my favourite bits of the current show, full of favourites (inc. Trisha Donnelly and Mark Leckey), were actually the photos by Hervé Guibert. A bit of the PR blurb: The writer and photographer Hervé Guibert travelled to Japan in 1984 for the newspaper Le Monde to visit Akira Kurosawa on the set of his film Ran. Despite the title of these photographs – “Tournage Ran II & III” – these two are the only known prints that Guibert made from this visit. They show extras on the film set in soldier costumes as they doze or rehearse poses in a wooden fortress.

Loads going on at KW Institute of Contemporary Art. Hanne Lippard’s audio piece Flesh was the stand out for me.

At C/O was Watched! Surveillance, Art & Photography which was a little like a mini Electronic Superhighway, including the ubiquitous Hito Steyerl (I just can’t get enough, it’s fine) and a brilliant but too wee installation by Meriç Algün Ringborg, Doppelgänger, from Which No One Will Ever See, 2012.

Cindy Sherman was at SPRÜTH MAGERS. If you like this sort of thing? asks SM, and I do.

The Jewish Museum had on Cherchez la Femme, which included lots of wig info – you know I love that. And that space, the one that gives your body a tiny inkling. More on the building here.

Tschüss!

Spolia – Lorna Macintyre at Cample Line

What a beautiful day it was to be motoring through parts of the country I normally only glimpse from a hurtling train, with L and N, past distant lamb and dry stane dyke, towards Cample Line.

Lorna’s excellent show, Spolia, manages to seamlessly meld geology, ancient mysterious objects and sculpting (both natural and intentional) with Irn Bru and Neil’s DVD player remote. Must be how I’m thinking about things right now (after scrutinising images of my recent photos, searching for squares, pixels) but Spolia also speaks eloquently about levels of resolution, density and the stuff of all surfaces. Which is the stuff of us all.

A great sarnie offering too – and a chance to catch up with Katie Anderson, one of our fine Fine Art artist alumni. Thank you to Tina, Holly, Katie, Andy and all at Cample Line.

Lorna Macintyre, Spolia, 2017

Lorna Macintyre, Spolia, 2017

Lorna Macintyre, Spolia, 2017

Lorna Macintyre, Spolia, 2017

Roger Hiorns at the Ikon

Thanks to a University of Cumbria Institute of the Arts related trip South, I got to see the Hiorns show at the Ikon (Birmingham). He seems like an old chum, having seen his work at Transmission and installed it at the Collins Gallery (University of Strathclyde, and now long gone) back in the day (that’s the early 2000s to you, jeez). The show looked to me like a sleek apocalypse – and he’s great with the traces of longing and nostalgia for youth (or is that youths?).

Also, the catalogue is a single essay (by Ruth Noack), surrounded by around 500 images of work and research, kinda, allegedly, un-curated. Delicious.

Roger Hiorns, Ikon Gallery, 2017

Roger Hiorns, Ikon Gallery, 2017

Kate Davis at the GFT

An early 2017 treat and a great way to become excited about Kate’s forthcoming film, a result of the Margaret Tait Award 2016, was this screening of Disgrace, Denkmal and Weight at the GFT on Sunday.

Thank you Davis and LUX Scotland.

Denkmal, Kate Davis

Screenshot of Denkmal, Kate Davis

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Screenshot of Disgrace, Kate Davis

Weight, Kate Davis

Screenshot of Weight, Kate Davis

Streetwise – Martin Bell – 1984

After an hour of scrambling around in that internet last week, big thanks to Calum and Stasia for pointing out to me that this whole, heartbreaking, documentary is on YouTube here.

220px-streetwise_1984_film

Project X

Watch this terrifying study of a journey and a building here.

“A top-secret handbook takes viewers on an undercover journey to Titanpointe, the site of a hidden partnership. Narrated by Rami Malek and Michelle Williams, and based on classified NSA documents, Project X reveals the inner workings of a windowless skyscraper in downtown Manhattan.

This film is the product of a joint reporting project between Field of Vision and The Intercept.”

Interview with the filmmakers here.

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The FBI occupies the entire 23rd floor of 26 Federal Plaza, seen here behind 33 Thomas Street. Still from “Project X”

25 years of reeves & mortimer the poignant moments

Vic and Bob – Vic and Bob – Vic and Bob.

25 years though – how the hell did that happen?

Some random clips here.

Kenneth Stot - thisisyourlieeeeef

Kenneth Stot – thisisyourlieeeeef

morecambe-wise_skip-dance