March, 2018

Annihilation – Alex Garland – 2018

Annihilation is a far less anaemic film than Ex Machina and the casting’s perfect. The Thing, Stalker, The Crystal World each get a nod and there’s a very, very frightening bear. Lucky I caught it before I rainbow-ed my own current work in progress though…

David Bowie is The Man Who Fell to Earth (2017)

A smashing Davidfest by Nacho’s Productions. Sigh. David Bowie is the Man Who Fell to Earth.


Margaret Salmon, Mm & Sacred Paws @ The Tramway

Live score for Margaret’s Salmon’s Mm by Sacred Paws was exciting! Mm showing Berwick Speedway lads transforming from ordinary to adonis-y over a day, reduced to 30 minutes here. Sacred Paws caused dancing and warm feelings of admiration, made even cosier by the presence of favs. L and L.

I See You Man @ Celine

I need to get back sharpish to see the rest of I See You Man at Celine, featuring favs. such as Sophie Macpherson and Clare Stephenson…

From Celine’s site is this great introductory text by Nadia Hebson – Plus reading group/events on March 31st…

I See You Man 25.02.2018 – 31.03.2018

Celine is happy to present an exhibition organised by Nadia Hebson and Sophie Macpherson:

In summer of 2016 Sophie Macpherson and I (Nadia Hebson) worked on a text which explored our shared interests in apparel, physicality, female subjectivity and friendship. Drawing on skype and email conversations the text took an epistolary form and ranged through personal perspectives on women artists’ practices and international events such as the ‘migrant crisis’ and the EU Referendum, alongside descriptions of sports clothing and club wear, and reflections on Dominique Strauss-Kahn and the paintings of Christina Ramberg. An unguarded but none the less edited script, the text became a short hand for the creative space of female friendship.

Writing about Elena Ferrante’s Neapolitan novels which detail the lifetime relationship of two women from an impoverished Neapolitan neighbourhood the writer Natasha Soobramanien likens the women’s friendship to an act of translation. Soobramanien writes ‘Lila and Lenù are translated beings, translating one another, shifting continually between the Neapolitan dialect of their childhood and the standard form of Italian both have a talent for expressing themselves in. And it is in this more rarefied linguistic sphere that Lenù finds success, and her professional voice as a writer (a voice modelled on Lila’s writerly voice)’. Lila and Lenu steel themselves through the confines of 60’s, 70s’ and 80’s femininity through the persistence of their complex friendship, which Ferrante so carefully atomises. They see one another and at times offer each a template for being, Ferrante’s writing of their friendship is closely analogous to the experience of creative friendship. And to understand female friendship as a form of translation is to recalibrate its constituents, becoming a space of attention, mirroring, testing, exchange, admiration and productive envy, a space of agency.

In taking the complexities of female friendship and the communicative possibilities of dress as a starting point we have invited artists and writers who are friends and potential friends to contribute work to I See You Man. These artists and writers work explore ideas of mentorship, resonance as described by Italian Feminist Carla Lonzi, feminist activism, translation, biography, fictional autobiography and the agency of dress.

Exhibiting artists: Phoebe Blatton and Annika Hüttmann, August Fröhls, Nadia Hebson, Stanya Kahn and Harry Dodge, Ellen Lesperance, Sophie Macpherson, Julia Schmidt, Clemence Seilles, Clare Stephenson

The title of the show ‘I See You Man’ is taken from work by Stanya Kahn and Harry Dodge.

Exhibition will then be open by appointment only: or 07500 343764 or 017827252941

On Saturday 31st March Celine will host an afternoon of performance, readings, talks and a reading group where the following texts and related material will be discussed. The below books and texts will be available throughout the duration of the exhibition.

Ingeborg Bachman, Three Paths to the Lake
Lucia Berlin, Manual for Cleaning Women
Kate Briggs, This Little Art
Daniela Cascella, Singed
Elfriede Jellinek, Jackie
Carla Lonzi, Autoritratto
Dorothy Richardson, Painted Roofs
Natasha Soobramanien Five Notes on Smarginature
Christa Wolf, The Quest for Christa T



Alchemists and alchemical-like types…

…seem to spring up everywhere when you start looking – all part of its symbolic mutability and what not. This week I have mostly been watching & reading, with Eggs and Aliens for The Curios Society as the excuse…

The Holy Mountain, The Colour of Pomegranates, El Topo, Picnic at Hanging Rock, A Dream Within A Dream, Get Out, Possession, Arrival, The Story of Your Life, Memoirs of a Spacewoman, Blade Runner 2049 (again) & The Exterminating Angel. A mixed bag, I think you can agree. What can I say? I’m a nibbler and a picker at the black, white and red buffet…


Spoorloos (1989)

From under a snow-topped blanket, I loved Spoorloos (The Vanishing), George Sluizer’s film is reminiscent of much of Eric Rohmer’s 80s output. Or maybe it’s a fashion thing?

‘Based on Time Krabbe’s The Golden Egg, The Vanishing is a deeply disturbing psychological thriller about a young man’s search for his girlfriend after she disappears at a rest stop during a short trip.’ IMDB

Eggs and Aliens

You’d never know it, but…there has been action. Trapped in Glasgow by snow, I hastily re-wrote my contribution to this sold out event The Curios Society at the Whitechapel

(Saturday 3rd March, 3pm, Whitechapel), so that Eggs and Aliens was delivered by ‘Fiona’, the ‘Scottish’ digital Word voice, who, when slowed to somewhere between slow and normal, sounds almost exactly like me anyway. A totally subjective trip from the first Alchemist to alien abduction, via a female mad scientist, two linguist spacewomen and a picnic, Eggs and Aliens‘ images were gamely moved along by the non-digital flesh finger of Robert Williams.

So I missed in person, Robert’s excellent discussions of his work with Dion and the brilliant Kate Briggs’ talk about the alchemy of translation… But I’ve got an audio file – a treat for later today…

Huge thanks to Jane Scarth and the tech team of The Whitechapel for the massive effort and for agreeing to let Fiona speak in the first place.

Fiona’s better than I am at pronouncing ouroboros anyway.



“Assembling on the first three Saturdays of Mark Dion: Theatre of the Natural WorldThe Curios Society meets to investigate the weird and wonderful, the unlikely and impossible. 

Alchemy can describe a philosophical tradition, an esoteric practice, a way of thinking and at times, an artistic methodology.

We meet artists Robert WilliamsKate Briggs and Jane Topping to explore ideas of the alchemical in art. From transmutation in translation to the figure of the alchemist in popular film cultures, this talk charts a course through the mysteries and cultural intersections of alchemy.”

Whitechapel website