Archives

March, 2017

Peter in the Philip K. Dick Science Fiction Film Festival 2017

Peter will screen as part of the 5th Philip K. Dick Film Festival in New York this May. Get in!

The exact programme to follow…

Hospitalfield Summer Residency 2017

I’m incredibly excited to be taking up the Hospitalfield Summer Residency 2017.

Incredible artists to hang out with, in ludicrously glorious environs. There’s an orangery. There’s a chef. It’s possible to eat the greatest cheese toastie known to anyone on the dunes, visit a sink hole close to a cock in a forest and lounge on a chaise lounges near a top hat and Titian’s Flora.

Oh, and I’ll be making a new video too.

More about Hospitalfield here.

An artist, yesterday

An artist, yesterday

Turn right here…

One Day in the Life of Andrei Arsenevich

I’m spending a bit of this day in my life being wowed by Marker’s essay on Tarkovski.

Trailer here.

Marker’s rushes of Sacrifice here.

Whole film in French here.

Chris Marker, 1999

Chris Marker, 1999

Dirty Screen Shot

Dirty Screen (Horses) Screen shot!

Dirty Screen (Horses) Screen shot!

Thanks Dr Mark Wilson

ANTIPHON – Kochi-Muziris Biennale 2016, Kerala, India

Delighted to be involved with this exciting event:

Friday 3 March – Tuesday 7 March

LUX Scotland presents ANTIPHON, a series of five screenings bringing together a selection of Scottish artists’ moving image work and titles from the LUX collection.

Evolutionary Jerks & Gradualist Creeps
Friday 3 March

A screening of Duncan Marquiss’ recent documentary film Evolutionary Jerks & Gradualist Creeps (2016), which considers analogies and differences between the cultural and biological realms. Comparing the history of life within the fossil record with the evolution of popular music, the film takes patterns of evolution as cues for image-making and editing structures. This film is presented alongside Copy Errors, Marquiss’ curated programme of research material and archival films that informed the development of Evolutionary Jerks & Gradualist Creeps.

Duncan Marquiss
Saturday 4 March

A programme of films by artist Duncan Marquiss from the last nine years, revealing shifts in style and execution. This body of work ranges from the material experimentation of his flicker films, to recent documentary videos that stem from his interest in biology. Works include Late Cinema (2009), Midday (2011), Midgie Noise from Video Artefacts (2008) and Search Film (2015).

The screening will be following by a Q&A with Duncan Marquiss and Nicole Yip, Director of LUX Scotland.

Like Stroking a Shadow
Monday 5 March

A programme of films on perception and understanding, fiction and reality, truth and uncertainty, and the unexplained. Programme features Sarah Forrest, Again, it objects (2016), Jane Topping, Peter, (2014), Torsten Lauschmann, Crazy Paving, (2014), and Adam Lewis Jacob, Vision, (2016), (produced by Elizabeth Murphy).

BRIDGIT
Tuesday 6 March

A screening of BRIDGIT (2016), a new work by artist Charlotte Prodger, preceeded by three short animations by the late artist and musician Katy Dove, whose works conjure life as an irrepressible internal rhythm, as well as an external world of colour, music, birdsong, woodland and sky. Programme features Katy Dove, Fantasy Freedom (1999), Luna (2004), Meaning in Action (2013), and Charlotte Prodger, BRIDGIT (2016).

Eglantine
Wednesday 7 March

The Indian premiere of acclaimed artist and filmmaker Margaret Salmon’s debut feature film Eglantine (2016), an intimate and vivid account of a young girl’s real and fantastical adventure in a remote forest one evening. Shot on 35mm in various locations around Scotland, this film draws inspiration from a range of cinematic movements as well as wildlife documentaries to produce a lyrical and sensual portrait of a child’s eye perspective on the natural world.

ANTIPHON is presented alongside Analogy Loom, a video art workshop with Duncan Marquiss taking place as part of Kochi-Muziris Biennale from 2 – 5 March.

ANTIPHON and Analogy Loom are hosted by LUX Scotland, British Council and Kochi Biennale Foundation.

Peter (Screen Shot) Digital film 29:55, 2014, Jane Topping.

Peter (Screen Shot) Digital film 29:55, 2014.

Family History – Gillian Wearing

I love this work and this book. I love GW. More on Family History here.

Family History, Gillian Wearing - the catalogue, 2007

Family History, Gillian Wearing – the catalogue, 2007

Spolia – Lorna Macintyre at Cample Line

What a beautiful day it was to be motoring through parts of the country I normally only glimpse from a hurtling train, with L and N, past distant lamb and dry stane dyke, towards Cample Line.

Lorna’s excellent show, Spolia, manages to seamlessly meld geology, ancient mysterious objects and sculpting (both natural and intentional) with Irn Bru and Neil’s DVD player remote. Must be how I’m thinking about things right now (after scrutinising images of my recent photos, searching for squares, pixels) but Spolia also speaks eloquently about levels of resolution, density and the stuff of all surfaces. Which is the stuff of us all.

A great sarnie offering too – and a chance to catch up with Katie Anderson, one of our fine Fine Art artist alumni. Thank you to Tina, Holly, Katie, Andy and all at Cample Line.

Lorna Macintyre, Spolia, 2017

Lorna Macintyre, Spolia, 2017

Lorna Macintyre, Spolia, 2017

Lorna Macintyre, Spolia, 2017

Roger Hiorns at the Ikon

Thanks to a University of Cumbria Institute of the Arts related trip South, I got to see the Hiorns show at the Ikon (Birmingham). He seems like an old chum, having seen his work at Transmission and installed it at the Collins Gallery (University of Strathclyde, and now long gone) back in the day (that’s the early 2000s to you, jeez). The show looked to me like a sleek apocalypse – and he’s great with the traces of longing and nostalgia for youth (or is that youths?).

Also, the catalogue is a single essay (by Ruth Noack), surrounded by around 500 images of work and research, kinda, allegedly, un-curated. Delicious.

Roger Hiorns, Ikon Gallery, 2017

Roger Hiorns, Ikon Gallery, 2017

Will Internets Eat Brain?

Probably.

Very pleased to have caught Gillian Wylde’s performance at the CCA last week – all part of the GFF. Poised, stylish and hilarious. Included surprise ending with live head massage.

Screen Shot, Gillian Wylde

Screen Shot, Gillian Wylde

From the CCA site:

Listen up! The best art & philosophy is on YouTube for sure. Video artist and writer Gillian Wylde will present a live performance of fragments, texts, images and ideas trending in some of her recent work. Wylde’s work stages a critical engagement with high/low theory, shadow feminisms, happy nihilisms and the mediated. Following her incredible video-essay performances at The Hague and Arnolfini, ‘Will Internets Eat Brain?’ is an exclusive insight to Wylde’s world, encompassing two performances followed by a discussion on her work.