View from Cockforest

Home (2009)

Here’s a link to Home, a 2009 BBC TV version of Ballard’s The Enormous Space, with Antony Sher. Just not quite (Wheatley’s) High-Rise enough for me. Budgets, one imagines.

But why aren’t the Beeb and/or Ch4 not making a Ballard-a-yr? It’s our cultural heritage init? We need a Ballard manufacturing company equivalent to Merchant Ivory. I christen it Inner Concrete. Now go…

 

JGB does Advertising

Following on from his 1958 Project for a New Novel, Ballard made this series of  five ‘Advertiser’s Announcements’ created and published from 1967 to 1971 in Ambit magazine. According to Ballard:

‘Back in the late 60s I produced a series of advertisements which I placed in various publications (Ambit, New Worlds, Ark and various continental alternative magazines), doing the art work myself and arranging for the blockmaking, and then delivering the block to the particular journal just as would a commercial advertiser. Of course I was advertising my own conceptual ideas, but I wanted to do so within the formal circumstances of classic commercial advertising — I wanted ads that would look in place in Vogue, Paris Match, Newsweek, etc. To maintain the integrity of the project I paid the commercial rate for the page, even in the case of Ambit, of which I was and still am Prose Editor. I would have liked to have branched out into Vogue and Newsweek, but cost alone stopped me…’

Much more on ballardian.com

Hospitalfield – on a Sunday morning…

Into the Unknown: A Journey through Science Fiction

Popped into the Barbican (a beautiful Ballardian thing if there ever was) on Friday for Into the Unknown: A Journey through Science Fiction. Really, I went to see Terence Broad’s autoencoded version of Blade Runner (an fascinating formal exercise – watch a clip of it here), but there were other treats too – a suit that once contained John Hurt, a model made for Silent Running by Doug Turnbull, the stunning, lush, smooooooth Invisible Cities # Part 1 # Metabolism by Pierre-Jean Giloux. A range of plug-ins from Cronenberg’s eXistenZ

More on the Barbican website here.

 

 

Back to Ballard

Writing and reading on a train for 12 hours or so this weekend, and post a re-read* ‘n’ watch** of Empire of the Sun, I’m now into Extreme Metaphors – an exhaustive collection of Ballard’s interviews. Read an interview with editor Simon Sellars here.

Angela Carter on Empire of the Sun (1984).

*Definitely read this.

**There is no need to ever watch this.

Topping 2016 – Munich

Thank you to experimental ear owner (the ears are real, their preferred MO avant-garde) CM for this spot of my (previously unknown) talents, in Munich.

Who knew?

A 35mm 208 Frame Version of Blade Runner for a Phone

I biked, I read, I made this wee video out of 35mm scraps. Felt the need to get working here at HF…

A 35mm 208 Frame Version of Blade Runner for a Phone

Hospitalfield – there’s something happening here…

Shoulder to Shoulder – FIELDWORK International Summer School co-programmed with Cicely Farrer and Gordon Douglas

Harp Celebration Day to mark the return of the newly renovated Erard Grecian Harp including talks and performances by scholar Simon Chadwick and harpist Sharron Griffiths.

Sculptural commission for the Picture Gallery by artist Simon Bedwell – Society.

Scones.

 

I Love Dick on the telly

Well, who doesn’t? Lots to love in Jill Soloway’s  TV version of Kraus’ novel fav. of mine. Excruciating in its accuracy of artists and of desire. Hilarious of course. Some episodes directed by Andrea Arnold!

Local fact: Ciara Philips has been in a lift with Bacon.

The Handmaid’s Tale 2017

This 1985 Atwood has never shifted from my top ten, and, like 1984, it works because there’s nothing in it that isn’t happening right now, to someone, somewhere. While Orwell’s future is made richer with language (and even includes a glossary), Atwood’s uses small, creeping increments of privation in the hope our ears prick up a la Niemöller’s First They Came. Want to step back 100 years? Just switch off all access to bank accounts marked with an F. Argggghhhhh…

The 1990 film of The Handmaid’s Tale feels like a made for TV erotic thriller, but Bruce Miller’s 2017 TV version is impeccable. And it’s sprouting into meatspace, in good ways…

Handmaid’s Tale Protest against Ohio abortion bill